Congenital torticollis

Common Name(s)

Congenital torticollis

Congenital torticollis is a condition in which a baby is born with its head tilted and has a limited range of motion in the head and neck. Congenital torticollis occurs because the baby's neck muscles are shortened, pulling the head in one direction and limiting the ability to move it. This may be a result of "crowding" in the uterus, limiting the baby's ability to move and fully develop. It may also occur when they baby is coming through the birth canal, especially if in a breech position (i.e. pelvis first, instead of head first).

Signs that a child has congenital torticollis may include having his or her head tilted to one side and the chin tilted toward the opposite side. In most children with congenital torticollis, the head will be tilted toward the right, indicating that the muscles on the right side of the neck are affected. The baby will also have inability or difficulty to move the head. This condition may cause lumps on the baby’s neck, but this often goes away before the first year of life. Usually, the mother or guardian notices the condition first. The doctor will run a few tests including a physical exam and X-rays to rule out other conditions that may cause the head to tilt. The doctor will also likely ask about the birth, and examine the baby’s hips because children with congenital torticollis often have hip dysplasia as well (See: Hip dysplasia).

This condition is treatable and may or may not require surgery. Nonsurgical treatment involves neck exercises to stretch the muscles. If this treatment does not re-align the neck and head as desired, then surgery may be necessary. Approximately 10% of children with congenital torticollis require surgery to correct the condition. Talk to your child's doctor if you think your child may have congenital torticollis to discuss the most current treatment options.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Congenital torticollis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Congenital torticollis" returned 15 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

CORR Insights(®): Is sternocleidomastoid muscle release effective in adults with neglected congenital muscular torticollis?
 

Author(s): Joseph Khoury

Journal: Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.. 2014 Apr;472(4):1279-80.

 

Last Updated: 4 Mar 2014

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Is sternocleidomastoid muscle release effective in adults with neglected congenital muscular torticollis?
 

Author(s): Kyung Sup Lim, Jong Sup Shim, Yeong Seok Lee

Journal: Clin. Orthop. Relat. Res.. 2014 Apr;472(4):1271-8.

 

Neglected congenital muscular torticollis is rare in adults but may be associated with pain and cosmetic problems. The efficacy of surgical correction in these patients has not been well established in the literature.

Last Updated: 4 Mar 2014

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Effect of strabismus surgery on torticollis caused by congenital superior oblique palsy in young children.
 

Author(s): Ramesh Kekunnaya, Sherwin J Isenberg

Journal: Indian J Ophthalmol. 2014 Mar;62(3):322-6.

 

To evaluate the outcome of strabismus surgery for congenital superior oblique palsy (SOP) in relation to correction of head tilt and hypertropia. The cohort of patients mainly involved very young children. This is the first study to use a standardized instrument to objectively measure ...

Last Updated: 11 Apr 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Congenital torticollis" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Newborn Head Molding and Later Asymmetries
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Plagiocephaly

 

Last Updated: 16 Nov 2014

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