Acromegaly

Common Name(s)

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a hormonal disorder that results from the pituitary gland producing too much growth hormone (GH). It is most often diagnosed in middle-aged adults, although symptoms can appear at any age. Signs and symptoms include abnormal growth and swelling of the hands and feet; bone changes that alter various facial features; arthritis; carpal tunnel syndrome; enlargement of body organs; and various other symptoms. The condition is usually caused by benign tumors on the pituitary called adenomas. Rarely, it is caused by tumors of the pancreas, lungs, and other parts of the brain. Acromegaly is usually treatable but when left untreated, it can result in serious illness and premature death. When GH-producing tumors occur in childhood, the disease that results is called gigantism rather than acromegaly.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acromegaly" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
Pituitary Network Association

To support, pursue, encourage, promote, and, where possible, fund research on pituitary disorders in a sustained and full-time effort to find a cure for these illnesses. The PNA will disseminate information helpful to the medical community, the public, and to pituitary patients and their families on matters regarding early detection, symptoms, treatments and resources available to patients with pituitary disease.

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2013

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acromegaly" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
Pituitary Network Association

To support, pursue, encourage, promote, and, where possible, fund research on pituitary disorders in a sustained and full-time effort to find a cure for these illnesses. The PNA will disseminate information helpful to the medical community, the public, and to pituitary patients and their families on matters regarding early detection, symptoms, treatments and resources available to patients with pituitary disease.

http://www.pituitary.org

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2013

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acromegaly" returned 490 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Gigantism, acromegaly, and GPR101 mutations.
 

Author(s): Adrian F Daly, Giampaolo Trivellin, Constantine A Stratakis

Journal: N. Engl. J. Med.. 2015 Mar;372(13):1265.

 

Last Updated: 26 Mar 2015

Go To URL
Clinical experiences and success rates of acromegaly treatment: the single center results of 62 patients.
 

Author(s): Mehtap Evran, Murat Sert, Tamer Tetiker

Journal:

 

This study aimed to report the clinical and outcome data from a large cohort of patients diagnosed with acromegaly and treated at our institution over a 20-year period.

Last Updated: 7 Jan 2015

Go To URL
Gigantism and acromegaly due to Xq26 microduplications and GPR101 mutation.
 

Author(s): Giampaolo Trivellin, Adrian F Daly, Fabio R Faucz, Bo Yuan, Liliya Rostomyan, Darwin O Larco, Marie Helene Schernthaner-Reiter, Eva Szarek, Letícia F Leal, Jean-Hubert Caberg, Emilie Castermans, Chiara Villa, Aggeliki Dimopoulos, Prashant Chittiboina, Paraskevi Xekouki, Nalini Shah, Daniel Metzger, Philippe A Lysy, Emanuele Ferrante, Natalia Strebkova, Nadia Mazerkina, Maria Chiara Zatelli, Maya Lodish, Anelia Horvath, Rodrigo Bertollo de Alexandre, Allison D Manning, Isaac Levy, Margaret F Keil, Maria de la Luz Sierra, Leonor Palmeira, Wouter Coppieters, Michel Georges, Luciana A Naves, Mauricette Jamar, Vincent Bours, T John Wu, Catherine S Choong, Jerome Bertherat, Philippe Chanson, Peter Kamenický, William E Farrell, Anne Barlier, Martha Quezado, Ivana Bjelobaba, Stanko S Stojilkovic, Jurgen Wess, Stefano Costanzi, Pengfei Liu, James R Lupski, Albert Beckers, Constantine A Stratakis

Journal: N. Engl. J. Med.. 2014 Dec;371(25):2363-74.

 

Increased secretion of growth hormone leads to gigantism in children and acromegaly in adults; the genetic causes of gigantism and acromegaly are poorly understood.

Last Updated: 18 Dec 2014

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acromegaly" returned 59 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

The quality of life and psychological, social and cognitive functioning of patients with acromegaly.
 

Author(s): Dorota Szcześniak, Aleksandra Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Joanna Rymaszewska

Journal: Adv Clin Exp Med. ;24(1):167-72.

 

Acromegaly is a rare and chronic disease, most often caused by a pituitary adenoma. Excessive secretion of the growth hormone (GH) leads to hepatic secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), which in turn causes characteristic changes in the patient's appearance, many skeletal ...

Last Updated: 30 Apr 2015

Go To URL
Advances in the pharmacotherapy of patients with acromegaly.
 

Author(s): Maria Fleseriu

Journal: Discov Med. 2014 Jun;17(96):329-38.

 

Acromegaly is a disease characterized by growth hormone (GH) excess originating, in approximately 95% of cases, from a somatotroph pituitary adenoma. Symptomatology and clinical features are due to GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 excess; unfortunately, for most patients diagnosis ...

Last Updated: 1 Jul 2014

Go To URL
Curious cases: Acromegaly and schizophrenia: an incidental association?
 

Author(s): Pedro Iglesias, Carmen Bernal, Juan J Díez

Journal: Schizophr Bull. 2014 Jul;40(4):740-3.

 

Acromegaly associated to schizophrenia was first reported ~60 years ago, and so far, it is unclear whether this association is causal or not. Our aim was to report new cases with both clinical entities and to discuss the potential pathophysiological mechanisms of this association.

Last Updated: 17 Jun 2014

Go To URL
 
 
Top

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Lanreotide Levels in Acromegaly
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acromegaly

 

Last Updated: 9 Jun 2009

Go to URL
The Treatment and Natural History of Acromegaly
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acromegaly; Pituitary Neoplasm

 

Last Updated: 28 Aug 2015

Go to URL