Acromegaly

Common Name(s)

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a hormonal disorder that results from the pituitary gland producing too much growth hormone (GH). It is most often diagnosed in middle-aged adults, although symptoms can appear at any age. Signs and symptoms include abnormal growth and swelling of the hands and feet; bone changes that alter various facial features; arthritis; carpal tunnel syndrome; enlargement of body organs; and various other symptoms. The condition is usually caused by benign tumors on the pituitary called adenomas. Rarely, it is caused by tumors of the pancreas, lungs, and other parts of the brain. Acromegaly is usually treatable but when left untreated, it can result in serious illness and premature death. When GH-producing tumors occur in childhood, the disease that results is called gigantism rather than acromegaly.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acromegaly" for support, advocacy or research.

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Pituitary Network Association

To support, pursue, encourage, promote, and, where possible, fund research on pituitary disorders in a sustained and full-time effort to find a cure for these illnesses. The PNA will disseminate information helpful to the medical community, the public, and to pituitary patients and their families on matters regarding early detection, symptoms, treatments and resources available to patients with pituitary disease.

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2013

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acromegaly" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
Pituitary Network Association

To support, pursue, encourage, promote, and, where possible, fund research on pituitary disorders in a sustained and full-time effort to find a cure for these illnesses. The PNA will disseminate information helpful to the medical community, the public, and to pituitary patients and their families on matters regarding early detection, symptoms, treatments and resources available to patients with pituitary disease.

http://www.pituitary.org

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2013

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acromegaly" returned 534 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

A randomised, open-label, parallel group phase 2 study of antisense oligonucleotide therapy in acromegaly.
 

Author(s): Peter J Trainer, John D C Newell-Price, John Ayuk, Simon J B Aylwin, Aled Rees, William Drake, Philippe Chanson, Thierry Brue, Susan M Webb, Carmen Fajardo, Javier Aller, Ann I McCormack, David J Torpy, George Tachas, Lynne Atley, David Ryder, Martin Bidlingmaier

Journal: Eur. J. Endocrinol.. 2018 Aug;179(2):97-108.

 

ATL1103 is a second-generation antisense oligomer targeting the human growth hormone (GH) receptor. This phase 2 randomised, open-label, parallel-group study assessed the potential of ATL1103 as a treatment for acromegaly.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Increasing frequency of combination medical therapy in the treatment of acromegaly with the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant.
 

Author(s): Christian J Strasburger, Anders Mattsson, Patrick Wilton, Ferah Aydin, Judith Hey-Hadavi, Beverly M K Biller

Journal: Eur. J. Endocrinol.. 2018 Apr;178(4):321-329.

 

Pegvisomant monotherapy is effective and safe in treatment of acromegaly. However, some clinicians combine pegvisomant with somatostatin analogues (SSA) or dopamine agonist (DA). In this analysis of ACROSTUDY, a long-term non-interventional study, the use of combination regimens was ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Variable skeletal anatomical features of acromegaly in the skull and craniocervical junction.
 

Author(s): Maria Piagkou, Othon Manolakos, Theodore Troupis, Nikolaos Lazaridis, Konstantinos Laios, Alexandros Samolis, Konstantinos Natsis

Journal: Acta Med Acad. 2017 Nov;46(2):162-168.

 

This study adds important information regarding the morphological alterations caused by growth hormone hypersecretion in the skull and craniocervical junction (CCJ). A variably asymmetric skull due to acromegaly coexists with expansion of the paranasal sinuses and multiple Wormian bones.

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acromegaly" returned 77 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Acromegaly features in the aging population].
 

Author(s): Nadia Anoun, Hanan El Ouahabi

Journal:

 

Somatotroph adenomas are rare in the aging population. Diagnosis of somatotroph adenomas is often long delayed and they are characterized by atypical clinical picture. Their diagnostic criteria are similar to those used for younger patients. Surgery, if possible, is the treatment ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Cardiovascular Disease in Acromegaly.
 

Author(s): Morali D Sharma, Anh V Nguyen, Spandana Brown, Richard J Robbins

Journal: Methodist Debakey Cardiovasc J. ;13(2):64-67.

 

In patients with acromegaly, chronic excess of growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) leads to the development of acromegalic cardiomyopathy. Its main features are biventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, and in later stages, systolic dysfunction and ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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[Modern diagnosis and postoperative monitoring of acromegaly patients at a neurosurgical clinic].
 

Author(s): L I Astaf'eva, P L Kalinin, B A Kadashev

Journal: Zh Vopr Neirokhir Im N N Burdenko. ;81(1):58-62.

 

Acromegaly is a severe disease associated with chronic overproduction of the growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), which is caused in most cases by pituitary adenoma. The main causes of mortality in acromegaly are cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, ...

Last Updated: 31 Dec 1969

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 31 May 2018

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Treatment Patterns and Treatment Outcomes for Acromegaly
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acromegaly

 

Last Updated: 10 Apr 2018

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