Acromegaly

Common Name(s)

Acromegaly

Acromegaly is a hormonal disorder that results from the pituitary gland producing too much growth hormone (GH). It is most often diagnosed in middle-aged adults, although symptoms can appear at any age. Signs and symptoms include abnormal growth and swelling of the hands and feet; bone changes that alter various facial features; arthritis; carpal tunnel syndrome; enlargement of body organs; and various other symptoms. The condition is usually caused by benign tumors on the pituitary called adenomas. Rarely, it is caused by tumors of the pancreas, lungs, and other parts of the brain. Acromegaly is usually treatable but when left untreated, it can result in serious illness and premature death. When GH-producing tumors occur in childhood, the disease that results is called gigantism rather than acromegaly.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acromegaly" for support, advocacy or research.

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Pituitary Network Association

To support, pursue, encourage, promote, and, where possible, fund research on pituitary disorders in a sustained and full-time effort to find a cure for these illnesses. The PNA will disseminate information helpful to the medical community, the public, and to pituitary patients and their families on matters regarding early detection, symptoms, treatments and resources available to patients with pituitary disease.

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2013

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How do you compare to others with this condition?

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acromegaly" for support, advocacy or research.

Logo
Pituitary Network Association

To support, pursue, encourage, promote, and, where possible, fund research on pituitary disorders in a sustained and full-time effort to find a cure for these illnesses. The PNA will disseminate information helpful to the medical community, the public, and to pituitary patients and their families on matters regarding early detection, symptoms, treatments and resources available to patients with pituitary disease.

http://www.pituitary.org

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2013

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acromegaly" returned 478 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Gigantism, acromegaly, and GPR101 mutations.
 

Author(s): Adrian F Daly, Giampaolo Trivellin, Constantine A Stratakis

Journal: N. Engl. J. Med.. 2015 Mar;372(13):1265.

 

Last Updated: 26 Mar 2015

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Bromocriptine, a dopamine agonist, increases growth hormone secretion in a patient with acromegaly.
 

Author(s): Zenei Arihara, Kanako Sakurai, Rika Yamashita, Satsuki Niitsuma, Takayuki Ueno, Nao Yamamura, Shozo Yamada, Naoko Inoshita, Kazuhiro Takahashi

Journal: Tohoku J. Exp. Med.. 2014 ;234(2):129-35.

 

Bromocriptine, a potent D2-dopamine agonist, suppresses growth hormone (GH) secretion in most patients with acromegaly and has been approved for the treatment of acromegaly. Here we report a patient with acromegaly who showed increased GH secretion after administration of bromocriptine. ...

Last Updated: 25 Sep 2014

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Acromegaly resolution after traumatic brain injury: a case report.
 

Author(s): Alejandro Cob

Journal:

 

Anterior hypopituitarism is a common complication of head trauma, with a prevalence of 30% to 70% among long-term survivors. This is a much higher frequency than previously thought and suggests that most cases of post-traumatic hypopituitarism remain undiagnosed and untreated. Symptoms ...

Last Updated: 16 Sep 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acromegaly" returned 57 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Advances in the pharmacotherapy of patients with acromegaly.
 

Author(s): Maria Fleseriu

Journal: Discov Med. 2014 Jun;17(96):329-38.

 

Acromegaly is a disease characterized by growth hormone (GH) excess originating, in approximately 95% of cases, from a somatotroph pituitary adenoma. Symptomatology and clinical features are due to GH and insulin-like growth factor 1 excess; unfortunately, for most patients diagnosis ...

Last Updated: 1 Jul 2014

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Risk of thyroid nodular disease and thyroid cancer in patients with acromegaly--meta-analysis and systematic review.
 

Author(s): Kosma Wolinski, Agata Czarnywojtek, Marek Ruchala

Journal:

 

Acromegaly is a quite rare chronic disease caused by the increased secretion of growth hormone (GH) and subsequently insulin - like growth factor 1. Although cardiovascular diseases remains the most common cause of mortality among acromegalic patients, increased prevalence of malignant ...

Last Updated: 19 Feb 2014

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Aggressive tumors and difficult choices in acromegaly.
 

Author(s): Carmen A Carrasco, Mônica Gadelha, Marcos Manavela, Oscar D Bruno

Journal: Pituitary. 2014 Jan;17 Suppl 1():S24-9.

 

The current article looks at some of the factors associated with pituitary adenomas displaying unusually aggressive biological and clinical behaviour in patients with acromegaly.

Last Updated: 30 Jan 2014

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

There are currently no related results available in Genetic Testing Registry.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Lanreotide Levels in Acromegaly
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acromegaly

 

Last Updated: 9 Jun 2009

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The Treatment and Natural History of Acromegaly
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Acromegaly; Pituitary Neoplasm

 

Last Updated: 30 Oct 2014

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