Childhood Disintegrative Disorder

Common Name(s)

Childhood Disintegrative Disorder

Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD) is a rare condition affecting a child's development. Children affected with this disorder develop normally until age 2-4, but then begin to demonstrate a severe loss of social, language, motor and other skills. CDD is associated with autism and is considered an autism spectrum disorder. Symptoms include a loss of skills already acquired related to language, play, and bowel/bladder control as well as social and motor skills. Although loss of skills often reaches a plateau by age 10, children with CDD will require lifelong support. Often people with CDD will also develop epilepsy, a seizure disorder. If signs and symptoms point to developmental delay, a physician or mental health specialist will test the child further to diagnose CDD. A physician or mental health specialist may order a neurologic exam, genetic test, communication test, lead screening, hearing/vision test, as well as other tests that measure development. There is no cure for CDD, but treatment is focused on medications and behavior therapy to reduce or manage symptoms.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Childhood Disintegrative Disorder" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Childhood Disintegrative Disorder" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Childhood Disintegrative Disorder" returned 1 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis: a new axis-III disorder in the differential diagnosis of childhood disintegrative disorder, early onset schizophrenia and late onset autism].
 

Author(s): C Creten, S van der Zwaan, R J Blankespoor, A Maatkamp, S Klinkenberg, V H J M van Kranen-Mastenbroek, J Nicolai, D M Dhossche, J van Os, J N M Schieveld

Journal: Tijdschr Psychiatr. 2012 ;54(5):475-9.

 

Childhood disintegrative disorder (CDD), early onset schizophrenia (EOS), and late onset autism (LOA) often follow a similar course: initially, development is normal, then there is a sudden neuropsychiatric deterioration of social interaction and communication skills, which is combined ...

Last Updated: 16 May 2012

Go To URL

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Childhood Disintegrative Disorder" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
Top

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in Genetics Home Reference.

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.