Acquired Hemophilia

Common Name(s)

Acquired Hemophilia

Acquired hemophilia is a rare form of hemophilia in which the body makes specialized proteins called autoantibodies that attack and disable coagulation factors (proteins in the blood that assist with the clotting process).  The most common coagulation factor attacked is coagulation factor VIII, though other coagulation factors, including factor V and factor IX have been associated with the condition. The production of autoantibodies is sometimes associated with pregnancy, immune system disorders (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome), viral infections cancer, or allergic reactions to certain drugs. In about half of cases, the cause of acquired hemophilia is unknown. Treatment may vary from person to person.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acquired Hemophilia" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acquired Hemophilia" returned 69 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Elderly patient with acquired hemophilia A with IX・XI and XII factor decline].
 

Author(s): Naofumi Hanyu, Yasuo Aota, Akihiko Gotoh, Michio Sakurai

Journal: Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi. 2015 ;52(3):285-90.

 

Acquired hemophilia is a rare bleeding diathesis caused by autoantibodies against clotting factor VIII. Many cases are associated with autoimmune disease, malignancy and an elderly status. Acquired hemophilia is very rare, with a reported annual incidence of 1.48/million/y. However, ...

Last Updated: 13 Aug 2015

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A study of 65 patients with acquired hemophilia A in Taiwan.
 

Author(s): Shang-Yi Huang, Woei Tsay, Shyuann-Yuh Lin, Szu-Chun Hsu, Mei-Hwa Hung, Ming-Ching Shen

Journal: J. Formos. Med. Assoc.. 2015 Apr;114(4):321-7.

 

Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare disorder that has not been comprehensively reported in the Chinese population. Treatment-related fatal sepsis (TRS), other than hemorrhage, is the leading cause of death in patients with AHA. However, researchers have not systematically evaluated ...

Last Updated: 4 Apr 2015

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Acquired hemophilia.
 

Author(s): Kenji Kimura, Akira Kuriyama, Naoki Kuninaga, Akira Sasaki

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2015 ;54(7):865.

 

Last Updated: 2 Apr 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acquired Hemophilia" returned 5 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Acquired hemophilia A: an underdiagnosed, severe bleeding disorder.
 

Author(s): Joanna Zdziarska, Jacek Musiał

Journal: Pol. Arch. Med. Wewn.. 2014 ;124(4):200-6.

 

Acquired hemophilia is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies that inhibit coagulation factor VIII. In most cases, it manifests with severe, often life‑threatening bleeds. Acquired hemophilia may be idiopathic or secondary to another condition, most commonly other autoimmune ...

Last Updated: 15 Apr 2014

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Acquired hemophilia associated with autoimmune bullous diseases: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Shinichi Makita, Takumi Aoki, Akira Watarai, Azusa Aida, Takuji Katayama, Mikio Danbara, Masaaki Higashihara, Koji Miyazaki

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2013 ;52(7):807-10.

 

Acquired hemophilia (AHA) is a relatively rare and life-threatening disease caused by autoantibodies against factor VIII. Autoimmune bullous diseases (ABD) are also caused by autoantibodies against specific skin proteins. We herein report two cases of AHA associated with ABD. These ...

Last Updated: 2 Apr 2013

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Treatment of acquired hemophilia A.
 

Author(s): P W Collins

Journal: J. Thromb. Haemost.. 2007 May;5(5):893-900.

 

Acquired hemophilia A (AH) is an autoimmune disease that leads to potentially severe bleeding. Management relies on rapid and accurate diagnosis, control of bleeding episodes and eradication of the inhibitor by immunosuppression. There is extensive literature about the disease but ...

Last Updated: 27 Apr 2007

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Last Updated: 18 Nov 2016

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Use of a TGA and TEM in the Assessment of the Efficacy of Treatment With APCC or rFVIIa
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Haemophilia

 

Last Updated: 17 Dec 2015

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