Acquired Hemophilia

Common Name(s)

Acquired Hemophilia

Acquired hemophilia is a rare form of hemophilia in which the body makes specialized proteins called autoantibodies that attack and disable coagulation factors (proteins in the blood that assist with the clotting process).  The most common coagulation factor attacked is coagulation factor VIII, though other coagulation factors, including factor V and factor IX have been associated with the condition. The production of autoantibodies is sometimes associated with pregnancy, immune system disorders (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjogren syndrome), viral infections cancer, or allergic reactions to certain drugs. In about half of cases, the cause of acquired hemophilia is unknown. Treatment may vary from person to person.
 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Acquired Hemophilia" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Acquired Hemophilia" returned 52 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Prognostic factors for remission of and survival in acquired hemophilia A (AHA): results from the GTH-AH 01/2010 study.
 

Author(s): Andreas Tiede, Robert Klamroth, Rüdiger E Scharf, Ralf U Trappe, Katharina Holstein, Angela Huth-Kühne, Saskia Gottstein, Ulrich Geisen, Joachim Schenk, Ute Scholz, Kristina Schilling, Peter Neumeister, Wolfgang Miesbach, Daniela Manner, Richard Greil, Charis von Auer, Manuela Krause, Klaus Leimkühler, Ulrich Kalus, Jan-Malte Blumtritt, Sonja Werwitzke, Eva Budde, Armin Koch, Paul Knöbl

Journal: Blood. 2015 Feb;125(7):1091-7.

 

Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is caused by autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII). Immunosuppressive treatment (IST) results in remission of disease in 60% to 80% of patients over a period of days to months. IST is associated with frequent adverse events, including infections as ...

Last Updated: 13 Feb 2015

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Anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody ACE910 prevents joint bleeds in a long-term primate model of acquired hemophilia A.
 

Author(s): Atsushi Muto, Kazutaka Yoshihashi, Minako Takeda, Takehisa Kitazawa, Tetsuhiro Soeda, Tomoyuki Igawa, Zenjiro Sampei, Taichi Kuramochi, Akihisa Sakamoto, Kenta Haraya, Kenji Adachi, Yoshiki Kawabe, Keiji Nogami, Midori Shima, Kunihiro Hattori

Journal: Blood. 2014 Nov;124(20):3165-71.

 

ACE910 is a humanized anti-factor IXa/X bispecific antibody mimicking the function of factor VIII (FVIII). We previously demonstrated in nonhuman primates that a single IV dose of ACE910 exerted hemostatic activity against hemophilic bleeds artificially induced in muscles and subcutis, ...

Last Updated: 14 Nov 2014

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Illustrated operative management of spontaneous bleeding and compartment syndrome of the lower extremity in a patient with acquired hemophilia A: a case report.
 

Author(s): Thorsten Jentzsch, Brigitte Brand-Staufer, Frank P Schäfer, Guido A Wanner, Hans-Peter Simmen

Journal:

 

Spontaneous bleeding resulting in compartment syndrome at the lower adult leg due to acquired hemophilia A is rare. There are no reports on operative management of this entity.

Last Updated: 4 Jun 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Acquired Hemophilia" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Chinese expert consensus on the diagnosis and treatment of acquired hemophilia A].
 

Author(s):

Journal: Zhonghua Xue Ye Xue Za Zhi. 2014 Jun;35(6):575-6.

 

Last Updated: 2 Jul 2014

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Acquired hemophilia associated with autoimmune bullous diseases: a report of two cases and a review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Shinichi Makita, Takumi Aoki, Akira Watarai, Azusa Aida, Takuji Katayama, Mikio Danbara, Masaaki Higashihara, Koji Miyazaki

Journal: Intern. Med.. 2013 ;52(7):807-10.

 

Acquired hemophilia (AHA) is a relatively rare and life-threatening disease caused by autoantibodies against factor VIII. Autoimmune bullous diseases (ABD) are also caused by autoantibodies against specific skin proteins. We herein report two cases of AHA associated with ABD. These ...

Last Updated: 2 Apr 2013

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Acquired hemophilia.
 

Author(s): P Bouvry, P Recloux

Journal: Haematologica. ;79(6):550-6.

 

Acquired hemophilia is a very rare disease characterized by the presence of an autoantibody (mainly IgG) to factor VIII, with a clinical presentation resembling hemophilia A. It is associated with various autoimmune or dermatologic diseases, pregnancy, cancer, or drug ingestion, but ...

Last Updated: 25 Apr 1995

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Turkish Acquired Haemophilia Registry
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Acquired Haemophilia

 

Last Updated: 26 Jul 2011

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Last Updated: 29 Jul 2015

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Use of a TGA and TEM in the Assessment of the Efficacy of Treatment With APCC or rFVIIa
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Haemophilia

 

Last Updated: 24 Jun 2014

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