Centrotemporal Epilepsy

Common Name(s)

Centrotemporal Epilepsy, Benign rolandic epilepsy

Centrotemporal epilepsy, also known as benign rolandic epilepsy, is a form of epilepsy where seizures affect the face and sometimes the body. This form of epilepsy does not affect adults, and seizures typically begin in affected children around the age of six to eight years old.

"Rolandic" refers to the region of the brain in which the seizures begin; this area of the brain is what controls the face. Rolandic seizures are considered "partial" seizures because they begin in a specific region of the brain rather than involving the entire brain. The seizures resulting from centrotemporal epilepsy are generally mild, and may include facial or cheek twitching, numbness or tingling in the tongue or face, difficulty speaking, and drooling due to the inability to not be able to control the mouth temporarily. Many times, rolandic seizures occur during sleep, so they may go unnoticed. Children with rolandic epilepsy may also have learning difficulties and behavioral issues.

In about half of children with this condition, the seizures begin in the rolandic region of the brain, but then spread to the rest of the brain. This is referred to as secondary generalized seizures (or tonic-clonic seizures) and symptoms are more severe and include full body muscle clenching, convulsions, unresponsiveness, and confusion or disorientation after the seizure is over.

Diagnosis of benign rolandic epilepsy is based on the pattern of seizures as well as testing which includes EEG, MRI and neurological exams. If symptoms remain mild, no treatment is needed as the seizures are often harmless and do not occur frequently. Symptoms that may suggest treatment would include learning difficulties, behavioral problems, daytime seizures or seizures that are frequent or become more severe. Anti-seizure medications are available in some cases. Please see a specialist if your child is having these symptoms to discuss the most current treatment options.

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Centrotemporal Epilepsy" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Centrotemporal Epilepsy" returned 48 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Interhemispheric Connectivity in Drug-Naive Benign Childhood Epilepsy With Centrotemporal Spikes: Combining Function and Diffusion MRI.
 

Author(s): Yun Wu, Gong-Jun Ji, Ke Li, Zhen Jin, Ya-Li Liu, Ya-Wei Zeng, Fang Fang

Journal: Medicine (Baltimore). 2015 Sep;94(37):e1550.

 

Decreased intelligence quotients (IQ) have been consistently reported in drug-naive benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS). We aimed to identify the neurophysiological basis of IQ deficits by studying interhemispheric and anatomical functional connectivity in ...

Last Updated: 17 Sep 2015

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Local Activity and Causal Connectivity in Children with Benign Epilepsy with Centrotemporal Spikes.
 

Author(s): Yun Wu, Gong-Jun Ji, Yu-Feng Zang, Wei Liao, Zhen Jin, Ya-Li Liu, Ke Li, Ya-Wei Zeng, Fang Fang

Journal:

 

The aim of the current study was to localize the epileptic focus and characterize its causal relation with other brain regions, to understand the cognitive deficits in children with benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance ...

Last Updated: 3 Aug 2015

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Structural abnormalities in benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS).
 

Author(s): Eun-Hee Kim, Mi-Sun Yum, Woo-Hyun Shim, Hye-Kyung Yoon, Yun-Jeong Lee, Tae-Sung Ko

Journal: Seizure. 2015 Apr;27():40-6.

 

The aim of this study was to investigate cortical thickness and gray matter volume abnormalities in benign childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BCECTS). We additionally assessed the effects of comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD) on these abnormalities.

Last Updated: 20 Apr 2015

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Centrotemporal Epilepsy" returned 3 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Transition issues for benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children, childhood absence epilepsy, and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.
 

Author(s): Carol S Camfield, Anne Berg, Ulrich Stephani, Elaine C Wirrell

Journal: Epilepsia. 2014 Aug;55 Suppl 3():16-20.

 

This chapter covers the syndromes of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children (NLFN), and the genetic generalized epilepsies. BECTS is an epilepsy syndrome that always enters terminal remission before the general age ...

Last Updated: 11 Sep 2014

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The electroencephalographic features of benign centrotemporal (rolandic) epilepsy of childhood.
 

Author(s): P Kellaway

Journal: Epilepsia. 2000 Aug;41(8):1053-6.

 

Last Updated: 5 Sep 2000

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Benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes.
 

Author(s): E C Wirrell

Journal: Epilepsia. 1998 ;39 Suppl 4():S32-41.

 

Benign epilepsy of childhood with centrotemporal spikes (BECT) is the most common partial epilepsy syndrome in the pediatric age group, with an onset between age 3 and 13 years. The typical presentation is a partial seizure with parasthesias and tonic or clonic activity of the lower ...

Last Updated: 30 Jun 1998

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Imaging the Effect of Centrotemporal Spikes and Seizures on Language in Children
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Benign Childhood Epilepsy With Centro-Temporal Spikes

 

Last Updated: 3 Feb 2015

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Effect of Auditory Stimulation on Spike Waves in Sleep
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Epilepsy; Sleep

 

Last Updated: 23 May 2016

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