Buruli ulcer

Common Name(s)

Buruli ulcer, Bairnsdale ulcer, Searls ulcer, Daintree ulcer

Buruli ulcer is a chronic (long-term) skin infection caused by a bacteria called Mycobacterium ulcerans. This bacteria releases a harmful substance that weakens the body's immune system and causes tissue damage. Though it has been reported in 33 countries, it is most common in tropical and sub-tropical climates and especially in poor, rural regions in Africa. Buruli ulcers can affect any race, age or age but is most commonly found in children ages 5-15 except in Australia where the average age is over 50. Initially, symptoms typically include a painless bump usually with additional swelling around it. It can also present as widespread painless swelling of the arms and legs. As the infection progresses, the skin bumps (nodules) turn into an ulcer, which can be larger under the skin than is visible by the swelling. In the most severe cases, bone can be involved. Arms and legs are most common sites of infection.

It is not known how this disease is contracted or spread. Therefore, prevention measures are unknown aside from early detection and diagnosis. There are current theories under investigation that an insect may play a role in carrying the disease, but this is not confirmed. There are currently no vaccines for preventing this disease, but the Baccillus Calmette-Guerin vaccine might provide temporary protection. Diagnosis is typically based on the presence of ulcers and additional specialized testing. If the disease is detected early, antibiotic treatment is effective in most people; however, if left untreated, long-term disability is the norm. Medications frequently used for treatment include a combination of antibiotics. Depending on the severity, surgery might be the more appropriate option.

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Buruli ulcer" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Buruli ulcer" returned 171 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Defining and targeting high-risk populations in Buruli ulcer--authors' reply.
 

Author(s): Quentin B Vincent, Marie-Françoise Ardant, Laurent Marsollier, Annick Chauty, Alexandre Alcaïs,

Journal: Lancet Glob Health. 2014 Nov;2(11):e630.

 

Last Updated: 2 Dec 2014

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Defining and targeting high-risk populations in Buruli ulcer.
 

Author(s): Jordi Landier, Arnaud Fontanet, Gaëtan Texier

Journal: Lancet Glob Health. 2014 Nov;2(11):e629.

 

Last Updated: 2 Dec 2014

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Ecological niche modelling of Hemipteran insects in Cameroon; the paradox of a vector-borne transmission for Mycobacterium ulcerans, the causative agent of Buruli ulcer.
 

Author(s): Kevin Carolan, Solange Meyin A Ebong, Andres Garchitorena, Jordi Landier, Daniel Sanhueza, Gaëtan Texier, Laurent Marsollier, Philipe Le Gall, Jean-François Guégan, Danny Lo Seen

Journal:

 

The mode of transmission of the emerging neglected disease Buruli ulcer is unknown. Several potential transmission pathways have been proposed, such as amoebae, or transmission through food webs. Several lines of evidence have suggested that biting aquatic insects, Naucoridae and ...

Last Updated: 28 Oct 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Buruli ulcer" returned 6 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

[Buruli ulcer: a dynamic transversal research model performed through the international network of Pasteur Institutes].
 

Author(s): Estelle Marion, Jordi Landier, Sara Eyangoh, Laurent Marsollier

Journal: Med Sci (Paris). 2013 Oct;29(10):912-7.

 

Buruli ulcer is an endemic severe human skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which prevails in western Africa in swampy areas and primarily hits children. Its gravity comes from the extent of tissue destruction, created by the toxin mycolactone. We describe here how the ...

Last Updated: 23 Oct 2013

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The impact of community health workers (CHWs) on Buruli ulcer in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review.
 

Author(s): Marius Zambou Vouking, Violette Claire Tamo, Lawrence Mbuagbaw

Journal:

 

Buruli ulcer (BU) is a cutaneous neglected tropical disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Participation of Community Health Workers (CHWs) is an integral part of the management of BU, yet their impact has not been systematically evaluated in sub-Saharan Africa.

Last Updated: 6 Sep 2013

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Buruli ulcer and mycolactone-producing mycobacteria.
 

Author(s): Kazue Nakanaga, Rie Roselyne Yotsu, Yoshihiko Hoshino, Koichi Suzuki, Masahiko Makino, Norihisa Ishii

Journal: Jpn. J. Infect. Dis.. 2013 ;66(2):83-8.

 

Buruli ulcer (BU) is an emerging human disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, which mainly affects the extremities. It is most endemic in sub-Saharan Africa; however, it has been reported worldwide, including in some non-tropical areas. "M. ulcerans subsp. shinshuense" is proposed ...

Last Updated: 21 Mar 2013

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Pathogenesis and Management of M. Ulcerans Disease, Buruli Ulcer
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Buruli Ulcer; Mycobacterium Ulcerans Disease

 

Last Updated: 2 Aug 2015

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WHO Drug Study for Buruli Ulcer - Comparison of SR8 and CR8
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Mycobacterium Ulcerans Infection

 

Last Updated: 2 Jan 2015

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Concomitant Infections of Mansonella Perstans in Tuberculosis and Buruli Ulcer Disease Patients From Ghana
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Mansonella Perstans Infection; Buruli Ulcer; Tuberculosis; Co-infection

 

Last Updated: 2 Aug 2015

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