Trimethylaminuria

Common Name(s)

Trimethylaminuria

Trimethylaminuria (TMAU) is a metabolic disorder in which an individual is not able to break down trimethylamine into smaller parts. Trimethylamine is the substance that gives fish their distinctive smell. Since an individual with TMAU is unable to break down trimethylamine, they tend to have a fish-like odor coming from their sweat, urine, reproductive fluids, and breath. TMAU is caused by a mutation in the FMO3 gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. This condition can be diagnosed by a test to measure the amount of trimethylamine in urine. Genetic testing can also be performed using a blood sample to diagnose TMAU. Although there is no cure for TMAU, the condition can be managed by reducing the amount of trimethylamine in the body. For example, people with TMAU can modify their diet to avoid foods with high levels of trimethylamine.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Trimethylaminuria" for support, advocacy or research.

MEBO RESEARCH

Unite sufferers and experts to initiate research into genetic and acquired diseases, including Trimethylaminuria, which result in malodor conditions; provide volunteer administrative services for testing, research, and public charity to sufferers around the world; public education campaign with 2 blogs in 2 languages, internet forum, email campaigns, and conferences; peer advocacy in two languages; actively involved in national and international rare disease organizations.

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2013

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Trimethylaminuria" for support, advocacy or research.

MEBO RESEARCH

Unite sufferers and experts to initiate research into genetic and acquired diseases, including Trimethylaminuria, which result in malodor conditions; provide volunteer administrative services for testing, research, and public charity to sufferers around the world; public education campaign with 2 blogs in 2 languages, internet forum, email campaigns, and conferences; peer advocacy in two languages; actively involved in national and international rare disease organizations.

http://meboresearch.org/

Last Updated: 20 Feb 2013

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General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Trimethylaminuria" returned 10 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Fish odor syndrome: a case report of trimethylaminuria.
 

Author(s): Catherine A Ulman, Julian J Trevino, Marvin Miller, Rishi K Gandhi

Journal:

 

Trimethylaminuria is a rare, autosomal recessive, metabolic disorder that results in accumulation of trimethylamine (TMA), which smells like rotten fish. The chemical is excreted in sweat and urine owing to a deficiency in the enzyme flavin monooxygenase 3 (FMO3). We report a case ...

Last Updated: 24 Jan 2014

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Archaebiotics: proposed therapeutic use of archaea to prevent trimethylaminuria and cardiovascular disease.
 

Author(s): Jean-François Brugère, Guillaume Borrel, Nadia Gaci, William Tottey, Paul W O'Toole, Corinne Malpuech-Brugère

Journal: Gut Microbes. ;5(1):5-10.

 

Trimethylamine (TMA) is produced by gut bacteria from dietary ingredients. In individuals with a hereditary defect in flavin-containing monooxygenase 3, bacterial TMA production is believed to contribute to the symptoms of trimethylaminuria (TMAU; fish-odor syndrome). Intestinal microbiota ...

Last Updated: 16 May 2014

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[Primary trimethylaminuria or fish odour syndrome: early diagnosis from primary care].
 

Author(s): A Romero García, M Bermejo Pastor, E Benito Alonso, F Barros Angueira, E Galán Gómez

Journal: An Pediatr (Barc). 2013 Apr;78(4):272-4.

 

Last Updated: 25 Mar 2013

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Trimethylaminuria" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.