Methylcobalamin deficiency cbl G type

Common Name(s)

Methylcobalamin deficiency cbl G type

Homocystinuria and megaloblastic anemia is an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism resulting from defects in the cobalamin (vitamin B12)-dependent pathway that converts homocysteine to methionine, which is catalyzed by methionine synthase. Clinical features are somewhat variable, but include delayed psychomotor development, megaloblastic anemia, homocystinuria, and hypomethioninemia, all of which respond to cobalamin supplementation. Methylmalonic aciduria is not present. Two complementation groups have been described based on fibroblast studies: CblE ({236270}) and CblG ({13:Watkins and Rosenblatt, 1988}). Most patients present in early infancy, but some patients with CblG have shown later onset ({9:Outteryck et al., 2012}). Cells from patients with CblE fail to incorporate methyltetrahydrofolate into methionine in whole cells, but cell extracts show normal methionine synthase activity in the presence of a reducing agent. Cells from patients with CblG have defects in the methionine synthase enzyme under both conditions (summary by {7:Leclerc et al., 1996}). CblE is caused by mutation in the MTRR gene ({602568}). {14:Watkins and Rosenblatt (1989)} commented on the clinical and biochemical heterogeneity in patients with cblE and cblG.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Methylcobalamin deficiency cbl G type" for support, advocacy or research.

Organic Acidemia Association

The Organic Acidemia Association is a volunteer non-profit organization whose mission is to empower families and health care professionals with knowledge in organic acidemia metabolic disorders. We support early intervention through expanded newborn screening, solicit contributions and distribute funding that supports research toward improved treatment and eventual cures in the areas of Organic Acid disorders.

www.oaanews.org

Last Updated: 18 Mar 2013

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
Top

How do you compare to others with this condition?

Privately answer questions about your health. Let resources, you select, come to you.

Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives.

 
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Methylcobalamin deficiency cbl G type" for support, advocacy or research.

Organic Acidemia Association

The Organic Acidemia Association is a volunteer non-profit organization whose mission is to empower families and health care professionals with knowledge in organic acidemia metabolic disorders. We support early intervention through expanded newborn screening, solicit contributions and distribute funding that supports research toward improved treatment and eventual cures in the areas of Organic Acid disorders.

www.oaanews.org

Last Updated: 18 Mar 2013

View Details

 

General Support Organizations

Not finding the support you need? Show General Support Organizations

 
 
 
 
Top

Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Methylcobalamin deficiency cbl G type" returned 0 free, full-text research articles on human participants.

Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Methylcobalamin deficiency cbl G type" returned 0 free, full-text review articles on human participants.

 
 
Top

Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in Genetics Home Reference.

 
 
Top

Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

There are currently no open clinical trials for this condition.