Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

Common Name(s)

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is an epilepsy syndrome characterized by myoclonic jerks (quick jerks of the arms or legs), generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCSs), and sometimes, absence seizures.  The seizures of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy often occur when people first awaken in the morning, especially if they are sleep-deprived. Drinking alcohol and psychological stress may also make these seizures more likely.  Onset typically occurs around adolesence in otherwise healthy children.  The exact cause of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy remains unknown.  Although patients usually require lifelong treatment with anticonvulsants, their overall prognosis is generally good.


 

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy" returned 154 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Late-onset Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy or Frontal Lobe Epilepsy with Myoclonus.
 

Author(s): Xin-Yue Zhang, Jin-Bei Yu, Dan Yang, Chun-Tao Han, Wei-Hong Lin

Journal: Chin. Med. J.. 2016 10;129(20):2508-2509.

 

Last Updated: 17 Oct 2016

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Altered Local Spontaneous Brain Activity in Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy: A Preliminary Resting-State fMRI Study.
 

Author(s): Sisi Jiang, Cheng Luo, Zhixuan Liu, Changyue Hou, Pu Wang, Li Dong, Chengqing Zhong, Yongxiu Lai, Yang Xia, Dezhong Yao

Journal: Neural Plast.. 2016 ;2016():3547203.

 

Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the regional synchronization of brain in patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME). Methods. Resting-state fMRI data were acquired from twenty-one patients with JME and twenty-two healthy subjects. Regional homogeneity (ReHo) ...

Last Updated: 29 Jan 2016

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Optical coherence tomography parameters in patients with photosensitive juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.
 

Author(s): Yasemin Bicer Gomceli, Berna Dogan, Fatma Genc, Elif Uygur, Deniz Turgut Coban, Abidin Erdal, Muhammed Kaz─▒m Erol

Journal: Seizure. 2016 Feb;35():36-40.

 

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is commonly associated with photoparoxysmal response (PPR) with a reported prevalence of 25-42%. In this study, we aim to explore the relationship between the PPR and Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) parameters in order to determine whether optic ...

Last Updated: 22 Feb 2016

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy" returned 9 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Transition issues for benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes, nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children, childhood absence epilepsy, and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.
 

Author(s): Carol S Camfield, Anne Berg, Ulrich Stephani, Elaine C Wirrell

Journal: Epilepsia. 2014 Aug;55 Suppl 3():16-20.

 

This chapter covers the syndromes of benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), nonlesional focal epilepsy in otherwise normal children (NLFN), and the genetic generalized epilepsies. BECTS is an epilepsy syndrome that always enters terminal remission before the general age ...

Last Updated: 11 Sep 2014

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Oxcarbazepine-induced myoclonic status epilepticus in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.
 

Author(s): Martina Fanella, Gabriella Egeo, Jinane Fattouch, Sara Casciato, Leonardo Lapenta, Alessandra Morano, Anna Teresa Giallonardo, Carlo Di Bonaventura

Journal: Epileptic Disord. 2013 Jun;15(2):181-7.

 

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) is a frequent idiopathic generalised epilepsy syndrome with typical clinical and EEG features that can usually be controlled by valproate monotherapy. JME may be underdiagnosed or misdiagnosed; in the latter case, it may be mistaken for partial epilepsy. ...

Last Updated: 3 Jul 2013

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Frontal lobe function and structure in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy: a comprehensive review of neuropsychological and imaging data.
 

Author(s): Britta Wandschneider, Pamela J Thompson, Christian Vollmar, Matthias J Koepp

Journal: Epilepsia. 2012 Dec;53(12):2091-8.

 

Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy is the most common idiopathic epilepsy syndrome and is considered a benign seizure disorder that responds well to antiepileptic drug treatment, in particular sodium valproate. By definition, routine brain imaging shows no abnormalities, but advanced imaging ...

Last Updated: 4 Dec 2012

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

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