Epidermal nevus

Common Name(s)

Epidermal nevus

Epidermal nevi are congenital lesions that affect about 1 in 1,000 people. They appear at or shortly after birth as localized epidermal thickening with hyperpigmentation that frequently follow the lines of Blaschko, suggesting that they result from postzygotic somatic mutation in the skin ({10:Paller et al., 1994}). A rare subgroup of epidermal nevi is clinically indistinguishable from other epidermal nevi, but displays histopathologic features typical of epidermolytic hyperkeratosis (see EHK, {113800}), and patients with this type of epidermal nevi sometimes have offspring with generalized EHK ({10:Paller et al., 1994}). Woolly hair nevus is a rare condition characterized by the development of woolly hair in a restricted area on the scalp, either present at birth or becoming evident later in life when scalp hair begins to grow. Woolly hair nevus can be an isolated finding or can occur in association with additional ectodermal defects; epidermal nevi have been reported in association with woolly hair nevi (summary by {11:Ramot and Zlotogorski, 2015}). Nevus sebaceous, a benign congenital skin lesion that preferentially affects the scalp and face, is characterized by hairless, yellow-orange plaques of various size and shape. Histology shows that nevus sebaceous is a hamartoma consisting of epidermal, sebaceous, and apocrine elements. About 24% of nevi develop secondary tumors, some of which may be malignant (summary by {2:Groesser et al., 2012}). Also see giant pigmented hairy nevus ({137550}) and malignant melanoma ({155600}).
 

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Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Epidermal nevus" for support, advocacy or research.

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Epidermal nevus" returned 34 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Keratinocytic epidermal nevus syndrome with Schwann cell proliferation, lipomatous tumour and mosaic KRAS mutation.
 

Author(s): Said Farschtschi, Victor-Felix Mautner, Silke Hollants, Christian Hagel, Marijke Spaepen, Christoph Schulte, Eric Legius, Hilde Brems

Journal:

 

Keratinocytic epidermal nevus syndrome (KENS) is a complex disorder not only characterized by the presence of epidermal nevi but also by abnormalities in the internal organ systems. A small number of cases with KENS are molecularly characterized and reported in the literature with ...

Last Updated: 1 May 2015

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Linear non-epidermolytic verrucous epidermal nevus.
 

Author(s): A Das, A Sen, V Mishra

Journal: Indian Pediatr. 2014 Jul;51(7):591.

 

Last Updated: 17 Jul 2014

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Verrucous epidermal nevus.
 

Author(s): Randie Kim, Shoshana Marmon, Jennifer Kaplan, Hideko Kamino, Miriam Keltz Pomeranz

Journal:

 

A 64-year-old man presented with a three-year history of an enlarging, pruritic, linear, verrucous plaque on his left lower extremity. Histopathologic examination was consistent with a verrucous epidermal nevus, which is a benign epidermal hamartoma, most commonly observed in the ...

Last Updated: 24 Dec 2013

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Epidermal nevus" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Oral linear epidermal nevus: a review of the literature and report of two new cases.
 

Author(s): Domenico Tesi, Giuseppe Ficarra

Journal: Head Neck Pathol. 2010 Jun;4(2):139-43.

 

Linear epidermal nevus (LEN) is a sporadic hamartomatous lesion of the skin due to the proliferation of clones of embryonic ectodermal cells, which are arranged according to a typical linear configuration known as Blaschko's lines. Oral involvement of LEN is very rare and few cases ...

Last Updated: 31 May 2010

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Study of KRN23 in Adult Subjects With Tumor-Induced Osteomalacia (TIO) or Epidermal Nevus Syndrome (ENS)
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Tumor Induced Osteomalacia (TIO); Epidermal Nevus Syndrome (ENS)

 

Last Updated: 15 Apr 2015

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Phase I Study for Autologous Dermal Substitutes and Dermo-epidermal Skin Substitutes for Treatment of Skin Defects
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Burn Injury; Soft Tissue Injury; Skin Necrosis; Scars; Congenital Giant Nevus; Skin Tumors

 

Last Updated: 2 Feb 2015

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