Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy

Common Name(s)

Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy, Fuchs' dystrophy

Fuchs’ dystrophy, also known as Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD), is a condition that affects the cornea, which is the clear cover over the front of the eye. The condition causes swelling of the cornea, leading to glare, blurry vision, and sensitivity to light. Fuchs’ dystrophy can also cause tiny painful blisters on the cornea. Most cases are mild and do not cause a major change to a person’s vision. However, in advanced cases, affected people may eventually lose their vision completely. In these cases, a corneal transplant is the only option to improve vision.

Fuchs’ dystrophy occurs when the cells that protect the cornea begin to die off and stop working properly. This situation leads to fluid buildup, swelling, and thickening of the cornea. Risk factors for Fuchs’ dystrophy include gender (being female), age (being over 50 years), and having a family history of the condition. Fuchs’ dystrophy can be inherited, but the genetics of the disease are unclear. Some cases of Fuchs’ dystrophy are caused by a change (mutation) in the COL8A2 gene, which provides instructions for the body to produce a protein that helps protect the cornea (collagen). Cases that are caused by mutations in the COL8A2 gene are inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. This means a mutation in one of the two COL8A2 copies a person has is enough to cause the condition.

Fuchs’ dystrophy is typically diagnosed by an eye doctor (ophthalmologist) during a detailed eye exam. There is currently no cure for Fuch's Dystrophy, but there are medical treatments, such as medications and soft contact lenses, that can help reduce glare, and relieve pain. Surgical procedures can be used to treat advanced Fuch’s dystrophy. If you have been diagnosed with Fuchs’ dystrophy, talk with your doctor about all current treatment options. Support groups can provide additional information and connect you with other families affected by Fuchs’ dystrophy.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy" returned 39 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

TCF4 Triplet Repeat Expansion and Nuclear RNA Foci in Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy.
 

Author(s): V Vinod Mootha, Imran Hussain, Khrishen Cunnusamy, Eric Graham, Xin Gong, Sudha Neelam, Chao Xing, Ralf Kittler, W Matthew Petroll

Journal:

 

Expansion of the intronic CTG18.1 triplet repeat locus within TCF4 contributes significant risk to the development of Fuchs' endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) in Eurasian populations, but the mechanisms by which the expanded repeats result in degeneration of the endothelium have ...

Last Updated: 26 Mar 2015

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RNA toxicity and missplicing in the common eye disease fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy.
 

Author(s): Jintang Du, Ross A Aleff, Elisabetta Soragni, Krishna Kalari, Jinfu Nie, Xiaojia Tang, Jaime Davila, Jean-Pierre Kocher, Sanjay V Patel, Joel M Gottesfeld, Keith H Baratz, Eric D Wieben

Journal: J. Biol. Chem.. 2015 Mar;290(10):5979-90.

 

Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is an inherited degenerative disease that affects the internal endothelial cell monolayer of the cornea and can result in corneal edema and vision loss in severe cases. FECD affects ∼5% of middle-aged Caucasians in the United States and ...

Last Updated: 9 Mar 2015

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Polymorphisms of the apoptosis-related FAS and FAS ligand genes in keratoconus and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy.
 

Author(s): Ewelina Synowiec, Katarzyna A Wojcik, Justyna Izdebska, Janusz Blasiak, Jerzy Szaflik, Jacek P Szaflik

Journal: Tohoku J. Exp. Med.. 2014 ;234(1):17-27.

 

Keratoconus (KC) is a non-inflammatory eye disease characterized by progressive corneal thinning and asymmetrical conical protrusion of the cornea. Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is a degenerative, slowly progressive disease of the corneal endothelium that is characterized ...

Last Updated: 29 Aug 2014

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of keratoconus and Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy.
 

Author(s): Katarzyna A Wojcik, Anna Kaminska, Janusz Blasiak, Jerzy Szaflik, Jacek P Szaflik

Journal:

 

Due to its localization and function, the cornea is regularly exposed to sunlight and atmospheric oxygen, mainly dioxygen, which produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, corneal cells are particularly susceptible to oxidative stress. The accumulation of ROS in the cornea ...

Last Updated: 25 Sep 2013

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Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy.
 

Author(s): Hussain Elhalis, Behrooz Azizi, Ula V Jurkunas

Journal: Ocul Surf. 2010 Oct;8(4):173-84.

 

Fuchs endothelial corneal dystrophy (FECD) is characterized by progressive loss of corneal endothelial cells, thickening of Descement's membrane and deposition of extracellular matrix in the form of guttae. When the number of endothelial cells becomes critically low, the cornea swells ...

Last Updated: 22 Oct 2010

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

The Molecular Pathogenesis of Late-onset Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Fuchs' Endothelial Dystrophy

 

Last Updated: 2 Jun 2015

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ODM 5 in the Treatment of Corneal Edematous Fuchs' Endothelial Dystrophy
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Fuchs' Endothelial Dystrophy; Corneal Edema

 

Last Updated: 20 Jan 2015

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Outcome After Descemet Membrane Endothelial Keratoplasty (DMEK) and Ultra-thin Descemet Stripping Automated Endothelial Keratoplasty (DSAEK)
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Fuchs' Endothelial Corneal Dystrophy; Bullous Keratopathy; Iridocorneal Endothelial Syndrome; Posterior Polymorphous Dystrophy; Endothelial Dysfunction

 

Last Updated: 18 Dec 2013

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