Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis

Common Name(s)

Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis, Attenuated FAP

Attenuated adenomatous familial polyposis (AFAP) is a specific form of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), a genetic condition that causes growths (polyps) in the large intestine (colon) and rectum that become cancerous over time. AFAP is considered to be a milder form of FAP. Individuals with AFAP tend to have a lesser amount of polyps, as well as a later age of onset, compared to those with FAP. Persons with AFAP usually have less than 100 polyps and develop colon cancer in their 50s, whereas individuals with FAP can have hundreds to thousands of polyps and tend to develop colon cancer in their 30s or 40s. Individuals with AFAP are also less likely to develop tumors in other areas of the body, unlike those affected by FAP.

Both FAP and AFAP are caused by a change (mutation) in the APC gene. This gene helps to keep cell growth under control. Mutations in APC can cause uncontrolled cell growth, leading to polyp formation in the colon and rectum. AFAP is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, which means a mutation in only one of the two copies a person has is enough to cause the condition.

Diagnosis of AFAP is considered in a person with multiple polyps in their colon that are identified with a procedure that uses a camera inserted into the colon (colonoscopy). The diagnosis is confirmed with genetic testing. Treatment of AFAP typically consists of regular colonoscopies to find and remove polyps before they become cancerous. In some cases, removal of part of the colon may be needed. If you or your child has been diagnosed with AFAP, talk to a doctor about the right treatment options. Meeting with a genetic counselor may also be helpful to discuss the inheritance of AFAP in your family. Additional resources, such as support groups, can also be helpful.

Source: Advocacy organizations associated with the condition.

 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis" for support, advocacy or research.

There are currently no organizations listed in Disease InfoSearch that support this condition. Create a listing.

 

 

General Support Organizations

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis" returned 14 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Clinical Utility Gene Card for: Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) and attenuated FAP (AFAP)--update 2014.
 

Author(s): Stefan Aretz, Hans F A Vasen, Sylviane Olschwang

Journal: Eur. J. Hum. Genet.. 2015 Jun;23(6):.

 

Last Updated: 14 May 2015

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Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis manifests as autosomal dominant late-onset colorectal cancer.
 

Author(s): Abdulla Ibrahim, Daniel R Barnes, Jacqueline Dunlop, Daniel Barrowdale, Antonis C Antoniou, Jonathan N Berg

Journal: Eur. J. Hum. Genet.. 2014 Nov;22(11):1330-3.

 

Colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is well defined for families of patients with classical familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). However, the risk for those with an attenuated form of FAP is less well characterised. In this study, we estimated CRC risks for carriers of a novel germline ...

Last Updated: 16 Oct 2014

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Colon cancer prevention by detection of APC gene mutation in a family with attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis.
 

Author(s): Kittiyod Poovorawan, Sirinporn Suksawatamnuay, Chucheep Sahakitrungruang, Sombat Treeprasertsuk, Naruemon Wisedopas, Piyawat Komolmit, Yong Poovorawan

Journal: Asian Pac. J. Cancer Prev.. 2012 ;13(10):5101-4.

 

Genetic mutation is a significant factor in colon CA pathogenesis. Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is an autosomal dominant hereditary disease characterized by multiple colorectal adenomatous polyps affecting a number of cases in the family. This report focuses on a family with ...

Last Updated: 18 Dec 2012

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis" returned 1 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Hepatocelluar carcinoma associated with attenuated familial adenomatous polyposis: a case report and review of the literature.
 

Author(s): Mingqing Li, David A Gerber, Mark Koruda, Bert H O'Neil

Journal: Clin Colorectal Cancer. 2012 Mar;11(1):77-81.

 

Last Updated: 7 Feb 2012

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Non-Surgical Management of Attenuated and Deleterious (Classical) Familial Adenomatous Polyposis: A Long-term Surveillance Program
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Attenuated Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Deleterious Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

 

Last Updated: 26 Oct 2016

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Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Reducing Duodenal Polyp Burden in Patients With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis at Risk of Developing Colon Cancer
 

Status: Not yet recruiting

Condition Summary: Attenuated Familial Adenomatous Polyposis; Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

 

Last Updated: 10 Nov 2016

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