Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome

Common Name(s)

Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome, Metabolic syndrome X

A clustering of abdominal obesity, high triglycerides, low levels of high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC), high blood pressure, and elevated fasting glucose levels is sometimes called metabolic syndrome X ({20:Reaven, 1988}) or abdominal obesity-metabolic syndrome ({4:Bjorntorp, 1991}). The syndrome may affect nearly 1 in 4 U.S. adults and is considered a veritable epidemic ({6:Ford et al., 2002}). It is a major risk factor for both diabetes mellitus (see {125853} and {8:Haffner et al., 1992}) and cardiovascular disease ({11:Isomaa et al., 2001}). The etiology is complex, determined by the interplay of both genetic and environmental factors. The prevalence varies substantially among ethnic groups, with the highest rates in Mexican American women ({19:Park et al., 2003}). Other factors influencing the metabolic syndrome include age, smoking, alcohol, diet, and physical inactivity. Genetic Heterogeneity of Abdominal Obesity-Metabolic Syndrome AOMS2 ({605572}) has been mapped to chromosome 17p12. AOMS3 ({615812}) is caused by mutation in the DYRK1B gene ({604556}) on chromosome 19q13. AOMS4 ({615980}) is caused by mutation in the LIPE gene ({151750}) on chromosome 19q13.
 

Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

HealthyWomen

HealthyWomen (HW) is the nation's leading independent health information source for women. Our core mission is to educate, inform and empower women to make smart health choices for themselves and their families. For more than 20 years, millions of women have been coming to HW for answers to their most pressing and personal health care questions. Through our wide array of online and print publications, HW provides health information that is original, objective, reviewed by medical experts and reflective of the advances in evidence-based health research.

Last Updated: 3 Oct 2013

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Advocacy and Support Organizations

 

Condition Specific Organizations

Following organizations serve the condition "Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome" for support, advocacy or research.

HealthyWomen

HealthyWomen (HW) is the nation's leading independent health information source for women. Our core mission is to educate, inform and empower women to make smart health choices for themselves and their families. For more than 20 years, millions of women have been coming to HW for answers to their most pressing and personal health care questions. Through our wide array of online and print publications, HW provides health information that is original, objective, reviewed by medical experts and reflective of the advances in evidence-based health research.

http://www.healthywomen.org

Last Updated: 3 Oct 2013

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Scientific Literature

Articles from the PubMed Database

Research articles describe the outcome of a single study. They are the published results of original research.
The terms "Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome" returned 14 free, full-text research articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Intra-abdominal fat area is a predictor for new onset of individual components of metabolic syndrome: MEtabolic syndRome and abdominaL ObesiTy (MERLOT study).
 

Author(s): Yoko M Nakao, Takashi Miyawaki, Shinji Yasuno, Kazuhiro Nakao, Sachiko Tanaka, Midori Ida, Masakazu Hirata, Masato Kasahara, Kiminori Hosoda, Kenji Ueshima, Kazuwa Nakao

Journal: Proc. Jpn. Acad., Ser. B, Phys. Biol. Sci.. 2012 ;88(8):454-61.

 

To investigate the significance of intra-abdominal fat area (IAFA) on new onset of individual components of the metabolic syndrome: high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, or hyperglycemia.

Last Updated: 12 Oct 2012

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Dietary patterns of women are associated with incident abdominal obesity but not metabolic syndrome.
 

Author(s): Ruth W Kimokoti, Philimon Gona, Lei Zhu, P K Newby, Barbara E Millen, Lisa S Brown, Ralph B D'Agostino, Teresa T Fung

Journal: J. Nutr.. 2012 Sep;142(9):1720-7.

 

Data on the relationship between empirical dietary patterns and metabolic syndrome (MetS) and its components in prospective study designs are limited. In addition, demographic and lifestyle determinants of MetS may modify the association between dietary patterns and the syndrome. ...

Last Updated: 22 Aug 2012

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Cut off values for abdominal obesity as a criterion of metabolic syndrome in an ethnic Kyrgyz population (Central Asian region).
 

Author(s): Aibek E Mirrakhimov, Olga S Lunegova, Alina S Kerimkulova, Cholpon B Moldokeeva, Malik P Nabiev, Erkin M Mirrakhimov

Journal:

 

People of different racial and ethnic backgrounds have a distinct pattern of central fat deposition, thus making it necessary to devise a race based approach for the diagnosis and evaluation of abdominal obesity (AO). This is the first study to determine the optimal waist circumference ...

Last Updated: 14 May 2012

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Reviews from the PubMed Database

Review articles summarize what is currently known about a disease. They discuss research previously published by others.
The terms "Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome" returned 2 free, full-text review articles on human participants. First 3 results:

Abdominal obesity and the metabolic syndrome: a surgeon's perspective.
 

Author(s): Patrick Mathieu

Journal: Can J Cardiol. 2008 Sep;24 Suppl D():19D-23D.

 

Over the past decade, a major shift in the clinical risk factors in the population undergoing a cardiac surgery has been observed. In the general population, an increasing prevalence of obesity has largely contributed to the development of cardiovascular disorders. Obesity is a heterogeneous ...

Last Updated: 12 Sep 2008

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Abdominal obesity and the metabolic syndrome: contribution to global cardiometabolic risk.
 

Author(s): Jean-Pierre Després, Isabelle Lemieux, Jean Bergeron, Philippe Pibarot, Patrick Mathieu, Eric Larose, Josep Rodés-Cabau, Olivier F Bertrand, Paul Poirier

Journal: Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.. 2008 Jun;28(6):1039-49.

 

There is currently substantial confusion between the conceptual definition of the metabolic syndrome and the clinical screening parameters and cut-off values proposed by various organizations (NCEP-ATP III, IDF, WHO, etc) to identify individuals with the metabolic syndrome. Although ...

Last Updated: 22 May 2008

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Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

There are currently no related results available in GeneReviews.

 
 
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Clinical Trial Information This information is provided by ClinicalTrials.gov

Efficacy and Safety Study of ALS-L1023 in Patients With Abdominal Obesity of Metabolic Syndrome
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome

 

Last Updated: 7 Mar 2014

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Aldosterone Antagonism and Microvascular Function
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome; Insulin Resistance; Hypertension

 

Last Updated: 14 Jan 2014

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A Health Promotion Project for Workers at National Taiwan University Hospital
 

Status: Recruiting

Condition Summary: Abdominal Obesity Metabolic Syndrome; Subjects With Poor Fitness Status.

 

Last Updated: 3 Dec 2013

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